Monday, January 11, 2016

Guest Lecture for History 12 at Sutherland, January 12, 2016


Thank you Mrs. Panton for inviting me back to Sutherland for this talk on the history of the Cold War Nuclear Conflict and our so-far successful attempts to prevent thermonuclear war.

The lecture material can be found in my PowerPoint here.

If you are interested in learning more about the topic, I highly recommend that you see as many of the following videos as possible:

Cold War Cuba 1959 - 1962 The Cold War: MAD-Mutually Assured Destruction (1960-72) Cold War Episode Star Wars 1980 1988 Q.E.D. - A Guide To Armageddon - Nuclear War Documentary (1982) On the 8th Day - Nuclear Winter Documentary (1984) War with Gwynne Dyer, Part 6: Notes on Nuclear War (1983)

Have a chuckle while watching the following civil defense videos.  PoSlicy makers never really believed that populations could be protected against an all-out nuclear assault.

You might also look out for the following films on the topic.  Some have been available on Youtube, though studios bring them down fairly quickly.  Hopefully you can access some of them.

Threads
The Day After
Doctor Strangelove
War Games
The War Game
Testament
Countdown to Looking Glass
On the Beach
By Dawn's Early Light
The Sum of All Fears
The Atomic Cafe
Day the World Ended
K-19; The Widowmaker
Failsafe
Miracle Mile
The Sacrifice







Wednesday, March 25, 2015



March 25-27, 2015



History 12

March 25, 26 and 27, 2015

Thank you all for welcoming me back for a little teaching therapy in my retirement.  Please find all class material posted below.  

March 25.  

Today's class dealt with the transition from Lenin to Stalin.  Click here to see the introductory videos and music of the Soviet Union in the 1930s and 40s that was playing as you came to class this morning -- there is a little over 1 hour of music.

.Access the the Powerpoint for the day: From Lenin to Stalin, here.



March 26.

Once again (time permitting), you came into class with some Stalin era music playing.  Songs may have included the Red Army Choir's Polyushka Polye and KalinkaComrade Song, and Song About Stalin.

Today's PowerPoint is The Stalin Revolution, which deals with Collectivization and Industrialization under Stalin.

Be sure to watch the video Stalin and the Modernisation of Russia, from the BBC's 20th Century History series -- all these episodes are tailor made for History 12.  If today and Friday were not shortened blocks, we would be watching it in class.


March 27

More introductory music will include some or all of the following:  Bolshevik Leaves Home, Smuglyanka Moldavanka, Stalin our Father, and the anthem of the Bolshevik Party (1939 lyrics).

The Powerpoint today is The Great Purge -- examining Stalin's purge of all elements of Soviet society in the late 1930s.

If you have an hour and a half, be sure to watch the BBC 2 documentary Stalin; Inside the Terror.




Useful Online Material:
Here are some links to video material you might find interesting:  

Joseph Stalin; Man of Steel
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Documentary on the life of a Zek (prisoner) in the Soviet prison system based on the important novel by Alexander Solzhenitsyn of the same name.
Stalin --1992 Movie staring Robert Duval1.

Excellent summary notes from his lectures on 20th century history -- The History Guide -- are provided online by professor Steven Kreis of Florida Atlantic University and Meredith College (Raleigh).  Of relevance to our study are the following:


A terrific source of resources on the USSR can be found at "The Soviet History Archive" page of The Marxist Internet Archive.

Yale university has a nice,short lecture by John Merriman (part of his European Civilization 1648-1945 course) online entitled Stalinism. New York University has posted a lecture, Stalin; Geopolitics, Ideas, Power.  You might also like to watch Daniel Bonevac's lecture, Stalin.

You might enjoy two short animated propaganda pieces from 1924 (5 minutes total).  Also Dziga Vertov's film, also from 1924, another example of Soviet animation. Vertov (real name David Abelevich Kaufman) was a Soviet film-making pioneer.  Film fanatics might enjoy his full-length movies,like Enthusiasm.

For those really interested in the development of film must see the work of Soviet film-maker Sergai Eisenstein, who influenced filming techniques everywhere -- he is still studied in film schools today.  Good Examples of his work include Strike -- about life in a factory during the reign of the Tsar.   The Battleship Potempkin is a classic about a mutiny during the 1905 rebellion.  October tells the story of the Bolshevik revolutionInterestingly, more damage was done to the Winter Palace during the filming of this movie than by the actual fighting itself. These are the films that directly relate to History 12, but film buffs would also be interested in other works, which can be easily found by gooling his name.

My old lecture notes, from when I first started teaching may still have some relevance.  The original notes are listed below:
Need some reading suggestions?  Try these literary works:

The White Guard by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Russian Civil War rages as Red forces close in on the White enclave in the Ukraine.  The Turbin family faces this test with the full range of human emotion --- from great courage to despondency and even courage. An age comes to a close and the future looks bleak.
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The doctor is swept along by events in early 20th century Russia.  His life and loves play off against events such as the 1905 uprising, the First World War, the overthrow of the Tsar and the Bolshevik Revolution and Civil War. This is a 20th century Russian novel that ranks alongside the great Russian literature of the previous century.
Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler
A former communist, Arthur Koestler sets out to explain how the great men of the Bolshevik Revolution could become the abject figures seen at thStalin's Show Trials of the 1930's -- admitting to any charges, no matter how ridiculous.
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Orwell described it as a "fairy tale" but it is so much more.  While children read it as a simple tale of a barnyard revolution, it is really a satirical allegory of Soviet History.  Idealism is betrayed and cynical tyranny installed. Orwell insists that it is not Socialism that failed in the USSR, but the brutal regime of Stalin that destroyed all that was good in the original dream.
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Devil visits Moscow during the 1930's, and with him come several assistants, including a gun-toting cat.  Bulgakov attacks the stifling repression of Stalin's Soviet Union and affirms that Soviet formalism destroys life. 


Friday, June 06, 2014

June 9 to Final Exam



Contact me by e-mail at: kbenoy@nvsd44.bc.ca   

This blog gives everything up to the final exam prior to strike action preventing my posting it.  You are expected to keep up on your own. Following this timeline we can finish each of my courses -- but you will have to fill in the gaps when classes are not in session.

Please understand that I am currently on strike and cannot deal with school work and issues.  Prior to this, I posted work for the rest of the year.  It isn't the same as being in class, but it is the best I can do.

Things that are static -- not requiring regular change -- can be found at my website:http://sites.google.com/site/kbenoy/.  Admittedly, I do not update this site regularly, so there may be dead links.

I take a few photos around the school, if you are interested, click here to see my Public Picassa photo albums. 


Click here for Graduation Banquet pictures.

So what have staff been up to during the strike/lockout.  Click here to see pictures. 

Grad Boat Cruise photos are now posted.

Recent albums include the Centennnial Theater and Sutherland concerts of the Asahikawa High School Wind Orchestra, the Senior Girls' soccer games vs Howe Sound, Carson, Windsor and Seycove - also the playoff games against St. Thomas More and Windsor. The Junior Girls vs Windsor, Handsworth, & the playoff game vs Sentinel, the Junior Boys' rugby game vs Seycove, and the May 9 Ultimate Tournament.  Finally, there are also pictures from Gwynne Dyer's talk to Senior Students.

***Strike Advisory: It looks like the end of the year turned into a train wreck.  Final exams look like they are cancelled for all but Provincially examined courses.  Social Studies 11 will write their test as scheduled, with administrators invigilating and marking to be sorted out later.

Social Studies 8 

We are now in the final unit -- Indian and Chinese civilizations (note:  loss of class time means we will have to lose the short Japan unit -- apologies to all for this).  If I delete the unit test for this section, I can complete the final unit on Japan after all.  Since learning is better than testing, it is an easy decision to make.

Bonus Opportunity!

bonus assignment was available to help you boost your mark before the final exam. I marked everything that came in prior to the all-out strike.    Please note, for every item completely finished 3 marks will be assigned to replace missed homework assignments (incomplete work will not earn marks).  If all homework is finished, 1 bonus mark per bonus item will be added to the appropriate unit test score.  This bonus work is excellent final exam studying.


  • Monday, June 9 -  Take up homework.  Watch What the Ancients did For Us; India - part 1part 2part 3part 4, part 5,part 6. List important Indian inventions and explain their significance. Read pp. 26-28, do #1-5, p. 28.
  • Tuesday, June 10 - Take up homework answers in class. Video on Akbar the Great - sorry, this is a video tape that is not available on the Internet. Why is Akbar considered one of the great figures in world history? If not in class -- or if you would like to learn more, watch Michael Wood's documentary: The Story of Indiapart 27part 28.   Read pp. 112-116.  Do #1-6, p. 116.
  • Wednesday, June 11 - Note:  This is a strike day.  You must do this on your own at home today. Take up homework.  Watch Three Teachings, an introduction to Chinese culture and its roots in Confucianism, Taoism and Buddism.  1.  Why is it possible for people to believe in all three teachings at the same time?   2.  What does each belief system focus on?    Read pp. 28-31.  Do #1-5, p. 31.
  • Thursday, June 12 - Take up homework. Video -- sorry this is unavailable on the Internet - on Shih Huang Ti (the Chi'in First Emperor). 1. How was the emperor able to unify China? 2. Why is he generally seen as an evil figure in history? 3. What great building project did he create? 4. How did he try to become immortal? Watch this film, Shih Huang Di as a substitute or to learn more. Read pp. 31-36. Do #1-6, p. 36.  If we have time this class, I will also show you John Green'sCrash Course; the Silk Road and Ancient Trade.  If we don't have time, please watch it on your own.
  • Friday, June 13 -  Take up #1-6, p.36. Take up homework. Watch What the Ancients Did for Us; the Chinese.   What great contributions did the Chinese give to the world.  Read pp. 117-121. Do #1-5, p. 121.
  • Monday, June 16 - Take up #1-5, p. 121.  Watch The Secret History of Genghis Khan1. How did Genghis Khan unify the Mongols? 2. Where did the Mongols expand after unification? 3. Why were the Mongols so successful. Read pp. 121-123. Do #1-5, p. 123.
  • Tuesday, June 17 -  Take up #1-5, p. 123.  Watch Kublai Khan; The Building of the Mongol Empire1. How did Kublai Khan come to rule China?   2.  How did being part of the Mongol empire lead to contact with the wider world?  Map Assignment:  South and East Asia.  10 marks, due next class. Read pp. 123-125. Do #1-7, p. 125. 
  • Wednesday, June 18 - Hand in the map assignment. Take up #1-7, p. 125. Video: Shinto Part 1Part 2. 1. What are Kami? 2. Would Shintoism appeal to non-Japanese people? Why or why not? 3. How is it that Buddhism and Shintoism can be practiced at the same time? Read pp. 126-130. Do #1-8, p. 130. 
  • Thursday, June 19 - Take up #1-8, p. 130. Watch Ancient Warriors; The Samuraipart 1part 2. 1. What were the Samurai? 2. How were the Samurai similar to Medieval European Knights? How were they different?  Your final exam is scheduled for Friday.
  • Friday, June 20 - Final Exam -- 100 multiple choice options.
Social Studies 11


I am concerned about any further loss in teaching time.  If more classes are lost to strike or lockout, I will have to direct students to cover curriculum on their own.  This will be outlined in future blog entries.  As it is, I will have to condense material to complete the whole course.  I will do my best to cover the material most likely to appear on the Provincial exam.

Expect me to assign video viewing, at least, on strike days from here on.  You must do this!

I will give a test for the whole of the Geography unit at the end.  This will be multiple choice only, so as to allow for it to be marked and entered on your report card.  You must not be away when it is written or you will earn no marks for the Geography unit -- which most people do best on.

At this time I do not have the Geography exam written. Expect it to be entirely multiple choice and probably around 100 questions.  50 flash cards will earn up to 8 bonus marks.

Now is also the time to begin thinking about and preparing for the Provincial Exam.

***Here is a set of summary notes for the Social Studies 11 course -- excellent for use in studying for the final exam. 

***Here is another, shorter, set of notes for the Social Studies 11 course.

***Here is a much more thorough webpage of review materials. 


Find another set of notes on the Counterpoints text at:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/ss11exam/Counterpoints.htm


Be sure to look at past exam material to get comfortable with the format.  Go to 

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/search/.


To see how to approach the essay questions, look at this document provided to train markers of the exam. Link from my web page on writing the SS11 final, and also see my PowerPoint on how to approach the test.

  • Monday, June 9 -  Take up #1-3 (both), p. 31. Video clip: The Seven Billionth.  Finish Ch. 2 PowerPoint - Population; Demographics.  If time we will watch Momentum 2011; Hans RoslingRead pp. 31-37. Do #1 on p. 37. Go to the US Census Bureau's International Database  (OK - this is a bit of a search.  Click on "International Data Base" on the top left hand side of the page.  On the new page, look on the left side and go into the "Report" drop down menu and select "Population Pyramid Graph."  Now select 2011 in the year menu and the countries you want, one at a time in "Select Country".)  Now and download and print a population pyramid for Nigeria in 2011. Do the same for Japan. Compare the shapes of these population pyramids. Suggest reasons why they are so different from one another.
  • Tuesday, June 10 - Take up #1 on p. 37. Look at the population pyramids for Japan and Nigeria and go over reasons why their shapes are so different. PowerPoint - continued, if need be. Watch Hans Rosling's What Stops Population Growth if we have time.
  • Wednesday, June 11 - This is a strike day.  Cover all of this material on your own.  There is no time to lose.  Look at Gapcast #2 - UrbanizationVideo segment and questions on Shanghai, Changing China - Urbanization ).  Read pp. 37-45. Do #1-6, p. 39 , #1-6, pp. 41-42, Do #1-5, p. 45. Watch China; From Red to Green.  How is China's population growth stimulating green thinking?  Provide examples of sustainable developments happening in Chinese cities.
  • Thursday, June 12 - Take up #1-6, p. 39 , #1-6, pp. 41-42.  Watch China; From Red to Green.  How is China's population growth stimulating green thinking?  Provide examples of sustainable developments happening in Chinese cities.  Now watch Masdar; the City of the Future; Fully Charged (part 1 and part 2). Can anything from the films we looked at today be applied to Vancouver?  Explain.  Read pp. 42-45. . Do the Further Thought assignment #1-5, p. 46.  Read pp. 368-375 in your blue Counterpoints text.  Do #1-4, p.372 & #1, p.375.
  • Friday, June 13 -  Take up #1-5, p. 45 and Further Thought #1-5, p. 46. and #-14, p. 370; #1, P. 375 in Counterpoints.  Chapter 3 PowerPoint. Read pp. 57-70. Do #1-8, p. 61, #1-5, p. 64 and #1-2, p. 70.
  • Monday, June 16 - Take up homework.   Take up  #1-8, p. 61, #1-5, p. 64 and #1-2, p. 70. Take up homework. Watch Hans Rosling's Chimpanzees Know Better, to see how countries and populations are and are not different around the world. Ch. 3 PowerPoint - be sure to do so yourself for homework if we cannot do so in class.   Read pp. 70-73. Do #1-8, p. 73 and 1, 2, 5 and 7, p. 74 in "Further Thought." 
  • Tuesday, June 17 - Take up homework.  Complete any chapter 3 material.   PowerPoint for Chapter 4 - Note -- we will move very quickly through this. Be sure to scan the PowerPoint again, on your own time, in order to take good notes.    Read pp. 83-93. Do #1-3, p. 84, #1-4, p. 85, #1-2, p. 86 and #1-3, p. 87, #1-4, p. 89, #1-5, p. 91 and #1-5, p. 93.
  • Wednesday, June 18 -  Take up homework.   Video: History’s Harvest (Part 1,Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5) and do the viewing guide questions. If time we will look at more of theChapter 4 PowerPoint. Read pp. 93-106. Do #1-6, p. 97 (but note "1997" in #3 should read "1973" and the typographical error in #5, where "grater" should read "greater"), #1-7, p. 102, #1-6, p. 105 and Further Thought #1-4, p. 108. Be sure to investigate the CBC Archives material on the GMO debate. Identify arguments for and against producing genetically modified foods. Study for the test next class.
  • Thursday, June 19 - Take up homework. Complete any remaining Chapter 4 PowerPoint.  Watch Gwynne Dyer being interviewed about his book Climate Wars on the effects of Climate Change on world conflict.  While watching, take notes on 1) Why is climate change likely to lead to conflict? and 2) Why is climate change more dangerous than most people realize?  Worldmapper animation Read pp. 114-132.  Do #1, p. 118, #1-4, p. 119,, #1-3, p. 120, #1-5, p. 123, #1-3, p. 129, #1-2, p. 131, #1-4, p. 132 and Further Thought #1-6, p. 132. 
  • Friday, June 20 - Take up homework. Chapter 5 PowerPoint Watch the amazing Dr. Hans Rosling's presentation at the 2006 TED Conference - The Seemingly Impossible is Possible. If you liked Hans Rosling, try William McDonough's TED lecture.
  • Monday, June 23 -  Geography Unit Test.
  • Tuesday, June 24 - Provincial Exam.  In the small gym from 1-3 p.m. You may have an extra hour of writing time if you wish.

Friday, May 30, 2014

June 2-6




Contact me by e-mail at: kbenoy@nvsd44.bc.ca 

This blog provides lesson plans for each week.  Look ahead to see where we are going.  Look back to see what you might have missed. All assignments are provided here.  If anything is underlined, click on it to bring up the document or, in the case of videos, link to an online version of what was scheduled for seeing in class or as enrichment.  
So you just want to see photos of Sutherland activities? Click here to see my Picasa Albums. 

Things that are static -- not requiring regular change -- can be found at my website:http://sites.google.com/site/kbenoy/.  Admittedly, I do not update this site regularly, so there may be dead links.


I take a few photos around the school, if you are interested, click here to see my Public Picassa photo albums.  


Grad Boat Cruise photos are now posted.

Recent albums include the Centennnial Theater and Sutherland concerts of the Asahikawa High School Wind Orchestra, the Senior Girls' soccer games vs Howe Sound, Carson, Windsor and Seycove - also the playoff games against St. Thomas More and Windsor. The Junior Girls vs Windsor, Handsworth, & the playoff game vs Sentinel, the Junior Boys' rugby game vs Seycove, and the May 9 Ultimate Tournament.  Finally, there are also pictures from Gwynne Dyer's talk to Senior Students.

***Strike Advisory:  Tuesday, June 3  has been set for North Vancouver's one day strike -- part of the ongoing labour dispute involving revolving strikes throughout the province.  There will be no classes Tuesday unless a settlement occurs.  Teachers are trying to minimize the strike's impact on students.  In the months that we have struck so far there has been little to no impact;  as the dispute ramps up the impact will be greater, but I am hopeful that things are sorted before the impact becomes appreciable.

***Partial Lockout Advisory:  I'm afraid this will impact students and I am not able to buffer them from its effects.  You can read the full letter by the Government's chief negotiator here.  Clearly those who wrote the letter don't understand the impact of what they order.  To justify cutting teacher pay by 10% they have reduced what we are allowed to do at work or at home:"...we are suspending the performance of specified duties and reducing the hours of work of your members, which provides the basis for this reduction in salary."  I face government sanctions if I try to do more than they outline!

Most significantly:"unit employees are directed not to work during recess or lunch hours except as specifically required by the essential services order."  This means I cannot supervise make up tests or provide tutorial assistance as I would normally...or provide the usual extra exam prep classes for Provincial Exam writers. We are also directed "not to attend their workplace earlier than 45 minutes before the commencement of their instructional time or later than 45 minutes after the end of their instructional time...." This means there is no longer the opportunity to make up missed tests before or after school -- as 45 minutes is insufficient to do so.  From now on, students will have to miss another class in order to make up tests.  

I have no idea how final exams will be marked if I cannot legally work beyond the hours they specify.  The Social Studies 11 provincial exam ends at 4:00 p.m. on the day before we are locked out for the remainder of the year.  I have to leave school before the exam ends and I will not walk into school the next day if all my other colleagues are locked out on the street. Someone else (not teachers) will have to mark these.  Similarly, now that the ministry has made it necessary to write non-provincial final exams during regular classes, I do not have time to mark these tests in the time provided and also complete report card entries. Report cards are endangered.  Clearly this dispute has the potential to turn the year end into a major train wreck.

Social Studies 8 





I expect we will write the Renaissance and Reformation unit test on Wednesday, June 4.  This test will be smaller than usual.   I expect the Renaissance and Reformation test will be as follows: 25 multiple choice questions (1 mark each) and a choice of two from four long answer questions (6 marks each). The total is, therefore, out of 37 marks. 30 properly-done flashcards are needed to earn 3 bonus marks. 

Please Note:  If you looked at the blog before Wednesday morning, I have made a change.  I've moved Thursday's homework to Wednesday, after the test.


    Social Studies 11 


    I am concerned about any further loss in teaching time.  If more classes are lost to strike or lockout, I will have to direct students to cover curriculum on their own.  This will be outlined in future blog entries.  As it is, I will have to condense material to complete the whole course.  I will do my best to cover the material most likely to appear on the Provincial exam.

    We made faster progress than I thought we would on Al Gore's film.  I have therefore changed the Thursday and Friday plan this week.  Please note this if you looked at the blog before Thursday.

    Now is also the time to begin thinking about and preparing for the Provincial Exam.

    ***Here is a set of summary notes for the Social Studies 11 course -- excellent for use in studying for the final exam. 

    ***Here is another, shorter, set of notes for the Social Studies 11 course.

    ***Here is a much more thorough webpage of review materials. 


    Find another set of notes on the Counterpoints text at:

    http://www.members.shaw.ca/ss11exam/Counterpoints.htm


    Be sure to look at past exam material to get comfortable with the format.  Go to 

    http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/search/.


    To see how to approach the essay questions, look at this document provided to train markers of the exam. Link from my web page on writing the SS11 final, and also see my PowerPoint on how to approach the test.

    • Monday, June 2 - Exam post-mortem.  Continue PowerPoint for chapter 1. Read pp. 6-16 of The 21st Century World text -- paper or online. Do #1-5, p. 11, #1-9 p. 16 and #1-4 pp. 16-17.  Video sidebar (I do not require you to watch this, but highly recommend that you do so:  Tom Friedman's MIT address - The World is Flat 3.0.)
    • Tuesday, June 3 - Sorry people, this is a strike day so there are no classes in session.  Use the time to begin preparation for the final exam.  In particular look at my PowerPoint on how to approach the final exam -- see above.
    • Wednesday, June 4 - Take up homework: #1-5, p. 11, #1-9 p. 16 and #1-4 pp. 16-17.  Complete the Chapter 1 PowerPoint if we did not do so on Thursday.  If time, begin watching Al Gore's seminal documentary An Inconvenient Truth and questions (part 1part 2part 3part 4,part 5part 6, part 7part 8part 9part 10) -- or buy it online (no I don't get a cut for advertising it and I really can't suggest checking Pirate Bay or an alternative)Read pp. 18-22. Do #1-4, p. 21.
    • Thursday, June 5 -  Take up #1-4, p. 21.  I think we should complete the resto of An Inconvenient Truth and questions (part 1part 2part 3part 4,part 5part 6, part 7part 8part 9part 10).  Discuss the video -- Why is it sometimes seen as controversial?  We will go over your conclusions from the Al Gore film and then will  watch Climate of Doubt which deals with the Climate Change denial viewpoint.  While watching it, answer the following questions:  1.  What groups in society are most prominent in denying climate change?  2.  What are their reasons for doing so? Work on flashcards for chapter 1.Read p. 22 and do the "Further Thought questions, #1-2, on p. 22. Optional: For an alternative view, see The Great Global Warming Swindle.  Interestingly every BC school was sent a free copy of this by an organization (hard to determine the parent organization) that felt it needed to combat Climate Change proponents. To make sense of this debate you could look into what respectable academic bodies say. Many countries have academies of science; investigate their views. The United Nations' Secretary General, Ban-Ki Moon recently traveled to the Arctic and he is on record as speaking on the subject during this trip. His view is representative of most of the world's nations on the topic. Also the 2007-2008 United Nations Human Development Report took as its over-arching theme Climate Change. You will find the report's accompanying video interesting (choose your download speed and language).
    • Friday, June 6 -  Take up #1-2, p. 22.  Watch Hans Rosling's  200 Years; 200 Countries; 4 MinutesBegin chapter 2 - PowerPointRead pp. 29-31. Do both #1-3 on p. 31.